Re-assignment of Parentage


In 2009 I received a revelation which dealt with the doctrine of re-assignment of parentage.  I told a few people privately and, as expected, no one believed it.  Unfortunately, I also got kind of a backlash from its private release, in which some denounced it as “of the devil,” while others said I was just a lunatic.

After I received the revelation, I believed it at once—(for all my revelations are true)—but then, upon pondering it afterward, I decided to see if there was scriptural precedence for it.  So I pulled out the scriptures and started searching.  Sure enough, this doctrine was written all over the freaking place.  In particular, this scripture stood out:

¶Now there stood by the cross of Jesus his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Cleophas, and Mary Magdalene.

When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother,

Woman, behold thy son!

Then saith he to the disciple,

Behold thy mother!

And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home.  (John 19:25-27)

In this case, the disciple received a new mother, and the woman received a new son.  Neither was biologically related, yet there occurred a re-assignment of parentage. I thought, “Okay, good.  When I tell people this revelation, and when they inevitably refuse to believe it, surely they will ask me for scriptural ‘proof’ that the doctrine is sound, so I’ll just turn to this passage and expound the doctrine to them.”

Unfortunately, instead of hearing the revelation and then asking questions concerning it, about its doctrinal basis and so forth, people just got offended by it, passed judgment upon me, and not a single one of them ever asked me to expound it.  Instead, they merely pondered it and then came to their own (unscriptural) conclusions based on their own false assumptions, without consulting with either the scriptures or myself.  I suppose this was to be expected, as I have a tendency of convincing people of my way of viewing things if they reach for the scriptures to try to prove me wrong, so the unspoken rule is that the scriptures are never to be consulted whenever I’m involved in any controversy.

Anyway, so 6 years have gone by and I’ve never explained the doctrine to anyone.  However, earlier this year I was contacted by email by one of the readers of this blog, who, after reading some of my writings about the Josephite restorer, was beginning to wonder whether this man might be himself.  He detailed many interesting facts about his life in his emails to me, one of which in particular caught my attention.  Now, I received his emails through my cupholder account, which I no longer have access to, so I’m just going on memory here, which might be off.  If he still visits this blog and reads what I write, according to my memory, and if it turns out my memory is wrong, he can correct me.  But, if my memory serves me right, I recall that he wrote in his emails that he was given a patriarchal blessing in which he was told he was of the tribe of Ephraim, but then he got an emendation of the blessing, and his tribe was switched from Ephraim to Manasseh.

I did not tell him of this revelation I received in 2009; but, as I have “two sets” of scriptures—the canon the standard LDS uses and my own personal “canon” of revelations—I could not help but compare what he told me to what the Holy Ghost told me in 2009.  The switch from Ephraim to Manasseh is the re-assignment of parentage, from one father (Ephraim) to a different father (Manasseh).

Now, re-assignment of parentage is what the gospel is all about.  Sin and death cuts us off (disinherits us) from God the Father, but, through the atonement and resurrection of Christ, and on condition of faith and repentance, we are allowed to become restored to the Father, through the re-assignment of parentage, Jesus Christ becoming our new Father.  In this way, we still inherit the blessings we lost through death and disobedience.

If we continue to rebel against God, again we get re-assigned parentage, the devil becoming our new father.  If we repent and exercise faith, we Gentiles get re-assigned parentage, Abraham becoming our mortal father, through whom we inherit the promises.  And so on, with each of the 12 tribes of Israel.  All of this is the doctrine of re-assignment of parentage.

Even in a contemporary setting, this doctrine plays out.  For example, if we adopt children, who are not literally our seed, they may be sealed to us for time and all eternity, as if they were our literal seed.  Thus they get re-assigned new parents, for this life and the next.

Okay, so recently I was thinking about what this man wrote to me about his switch from Ephraim to Manasseh, and I wondered about the Josephite, whether some kind of re-assignment of parentage would indeed take place for him, like what happened to this man.  The lineage of the Josephite is of three kinds: Gentile, Lamanitish and Josephite.  (My understanding is that he was raised as a Gentile, so I will count that as a “lineage.”)  Then, I suppose, when he gets into the church of God (the Mormon church), the Lamanitish lineage would manifest.  After all, the Nephites, when they self-destructed, were assimilated into the Lamanites (those Nephites who remained alive, that is), so they became Lamanites, and this Lamanitish lineage has stayed strong for more than a thousand years.

But then at some point this guy is going to have the Nephite part of him manifest, right?  And when that part of him starts to manifest, might there not be a corresponding lineage switch?  In other words, while he is still in “Lamanite-mode,” his parentage consists of these parents, but when he goes into “Nephite-mode,” his parentage changes to those parents.  It all corresponds to the level of faith exercised.  It takes a certain level of faith to go from unbelieving Gentile to believing LDS (re-assigned into the house of Israel as a “Lamanite.”)  And it takes an even greater level of faith to go from a believing LDS “Lamanite” to a bona fide Nephite.  When any of these levels of faith are manifested or exercised, God changes the lineage accordingly, to match that faith.  Thus, the Josephite will journey from Gentile, to Abrahamic covenant (through baptism into the church of God), to Lamanite (starting to suspect his lineage), to Nephite covenant, as a full blown Josephite.

Thus, it seems to me entirely possible that we are going to hear of some kind of re-assignment of parentage from this guy, such as what this blog visitor wrote to me about, or perhaps like what happened to that disciple of Jesus.

P.S.

Do not ask me about the revelation.  I am not going to release it in any form publicly.

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Nehor’s and Amlici’s origin and plan


Royal Skousen postulates that the words Amlicite and Amalekite found in the Book of Mormon are speaking of the same group of people, but just spelled differently by Oliver Cowdery, because of the different way that this term can be, and was, pronounced by Joseph Smith when he dictated the text to Oliver: [AM-uh-luh-kite] and [AM-luh-kite].

If this is the truth—and it does, to my ears, sound like a reasonable assumption—then we end up with an apparent anachronism in the Book of Mormon, for Amlici is first mentioned as being among the Nephites in 87 B.C., and he was a follower of Nehor, who himself is first mentioned as being among the Nephites in 91 B.C., and who died that very same year; but later on the Book of Mormon mentions that Aaron, a Nephite missionary, started preaching the gospel in Lamanite territory in about 90 B.C., which is one year before Nehor is mentioned as preaching among the Nephites, yet the text says that Jerusalem, which was the city that Aaron started preaching in, was built by the Lamanites and Amalekites (Amlicites) and Amulonites, and that most of these Amalekites (Amlicites) and Amulonites were of the order of Nehors.

We need not assume anarchronism

Keeping in mind that the Book of Mormon is an abridgment, here is a possible backstory:

Noah and his priests were preaching, essentially, the same doctrine that Nehor was found preaching later on:

Nehor’s doctrine

And he had gone about among the people, preaching to them that which he termed to be the word of God, bearing down against the church; declaring unto the people that every priest and teacher ought to become popular; and they ought not to labor with their hands, but that they ought to be supported by the people.

And he also testified unto the people that all mankind should be saved at the last day, and that they need not fear nor tremble, but that they might lift up their heads and rejoice; for the Lord had created all men, and had also redeemed all men; and, in the end, all men should have eternal life.  (Alma 1:3-4)

The doctrine of the priests of Noah was based upon the scripture they quoted to Abinadi, which they interpreted as meaning “salvation for all”:

And it came to pass that one of them said unto him:

What meaneth the words which are written, and which have been taught by our fathers, saying:

How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings; that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good; that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth;

Thy watchmen shall lift up the voice; with the voice together shall they sing; for they shall see eye to eye when the Lord shall bring again Zion;

Break forth into joy; sing together ye waste places of Jerusalem; for the Lord hath comforted his people, he hath redeemed Jerusalem;

The Lord hath made bare his holy arm in the eyes of all the nations, and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God?  (Mosiah 12:20-24)

(See King Noah and the Redemption of Zion for more on this scripture and the priests’ false understanding of it.)

The doctrine of Nehor and that of the priests of Noah was virtually identical because Nehor’s doctrine was based upon the doctrine of the priests.  It was merely a modification of the priests’ doctrine, Nehor himself being a Nephite dissenter living among the Lamanites, who ended up becoming a disciple of the priests of Noah, and later their main teacher, having altered their doctrine just a little to fit their current circumstances among the Lamanites.  Here are some similarities:

Both taught vain doctrines and flattered the people.

Yea, and they also became idolatrous, because they were deceived by the vain and flattering words of the king and priests; for they did speak flattering things unto them.  (Mosiah 11:7)

Nevertheless, this did not put an end to the spreading of priestcraft through the land; for there were many who loved the vain things of the world, and they went forth preaching false doctrines; and this they did for the sake of riches and honor.  (Alma 1:16)

And he also testified unto the people that all mankind should be saved at the last day, and that they need not fear nor tremble, but that they might lift up their heads and rejoice; for the Lord had created all men, and had also redeemed all men; and, in the end, all men should have eternal life.  (Alma 1:4)

Both taught that the pastors of the people ought to become popular and be lazy and be supported by the people.

For he put down all the priests that had been consecrated by his father, and consecrated new ones in their stead, such as were lifted up in the pride of their hearts.  (Mosiah 11:5)

Yea, and thus they were supported in their laziness, and in their idolatry, and in their whoredoms, by the taxes which king Noah had put upon his people; thus did the people labor exceedingly to support iniquity.  (Mosiah 11:6)

And the seats which were set apart for the high priests, which were above all the other seats, he did ornament with pure gold; and he caused a breastwork to be built before them, that they might rest their bodies and their arms upon while they should speak lying and vain words to his people.  (Mosiah 11:11)

And he had gone about among the people, preaching to them that which he termed to be the word of God, bearing down against the church; declaring unto the people that every priest and teacher ought to become popular; and they ought not to labor with their hands, but that they ought to be supported by the people.  (Alma 1:3)

Enforced, as opposed to non-enforced, priestcraft

The main difference between the doctrine of Nehor and the priests of Noah was in how the money was obtained.   In the case of the wicked priests of Noah, they were practicing enforced priestcraft, being enforced by king Noah’s law and army, and supported by king Noah’s taxation of the people.  This was, in effect, a money machine, but it was eventually broken up after king Noah was burned at the stake.  Nevertheless, his priests escaped and later became Lamanites, and the Lamanite king ended up making them the teachers of his people.  As teachers, they had no way to tax the Lamanites and restore the former order, (which was that priestcraft money machine.)  So, Nehor, the new disciple-turned-main teacher, altered the order by making it a cash-for-preaching affair.  This was, admittedly, an inferior mechanism for generating a profit, but it was the best they could do among the Lamanites.

Where the Amulonites and Amalekites (Amlicites) came from

The Amulonites were descendants and followers of Amulon, the leader of king Noah’s priests, who were now Lamanite teachers, and this is why they were found among the Lamanites.  The Amalekites (Amlicites), on the other hand, were followers of Amaleki (Amlici), all of whom were Nephite dissenters living among the Lamanites, and most of whom were now followers of the new order of Nehor.

Now when Ammon and his brethren separated themselves in the borders of the land of the Lamanites, behold Aaron took his journey towards the land which was called by the Lamanites, Jerusalem, calling it after the land of their fathers’ nativity; and it was away joining the borders of Mormon.

Now the Lamanites and the Amalekites and the people of Amulon had built a great city, which was called Jerusalem.

Now the Lamanites of themselves were sufficiently hardened, but the Amalekites and the Amulonites were still harder; therefore they did cause the Lamanites that they should harden their hearts, that they should wax strong in wickedness and their abominations.

And it came to pass that Aaron came to the city of Jerusalem, and first began to preach to the Amalekites. And he began to preach to them in their synagogues, for they had built synagogues after the order of the Nehors; for many of the Amalekites and the Amulonites were after the order of the Nehors.  (Alma 21:1-4)

All of these wicked men practiced, (or continued to practice, in the case of the Amulonites), priestcraft in Lamanite territory.

And Aaron answered him and said unto him:

Believest thou that there is a God?

And the king said:

I know that the Amalekites say that there is a God, and I have granted unto them that they should build sanctuaries, that they may assemble themselves together to worship him.  (Alma 22:7)

Back in Nephite territory, then, in 91 B.C., when Alma says the following to Nehor about this being the first time priestcraft has been practiced among the people, he is speaking strictly about the people of the Nephites of the land of Zarahemla, for priestcraft was first initiated in all its full-blown “glory” with Noah and his priests in the land of Lehi-Nephi and the land of Shilom, and then transferred in a less efficient mode to the Lamanite-controlled lands:

But Alma said unto him:

Behold, this is the first time that priestcraft has been introduced among this people. And behold, thou art not only guilty of priestcraft, but hast endeavored to enforce it by the sword; and were priestcraft to be enforced among this people it would prove their entire destruction.  (Alma 1:12)

Everything that Alma says here is entirely prophetic, for this was the very plan of both Nehor and Amlici, as I will show in a moment.

Nehor and Amlici among the Lamanites

Nehor and Amlici, who were Nephite dissenters living in Lamanite territory, could not turn the profit that they wanted to make, so they, as the chief dissenters among the Lamanites, thought to transfer the operation into Nephite lands.  The plan was to have Nehor and Amlici, and many of the Amlicites (Amalekites) cross the border and relocate back into Zarahemla and surrounding regions.  Nehor would then start preaching his doctrine, and instantly get many “converts” (the Amlicites/Amalekites who had crossed over), which would generate a great deal of interest among the people, for whatever was prospered was assumed to be the hand of the Lord bestowing His prosperity miracle.  When enough real converts were gained, Nehor or Amlici would make a call to change the laws to install a king in the land.  There were many reasons for this, but one of the main ones was so that they could re-establish the enforced priestcraft of king Noah’s reign, through taxation, and make a ton of money.

Fortunately, though, Nehor’s life was cut short by his meeting with Gideon and his subsequent execution in 91 B.C.  But that didn’t deter Amlici and the rest of the Amlicites/Amalekites of their plan—for the Nephites were never deterred in anything they put their mind to—it merely delayed them for about 4 or 5 years.  In 87 B.C., Amlici decided that it was time to call for a vote.  Now, the plan was that even if the vote went sour, Amlici would call to be anointed king anyway and the fake converts (the dissenters who crossed the border) would support him, and then the real converts would also support them, so that he would have an army of Amlicites/Amalekites to oppose the Nephites by force of arms on the Zarahemla side of the border.

On the other side of the border, the Amalekites/Amlicites and other Nephite dissenters, had, according to their secret plan, already stirred up the Lamanites to yet another invasion.  The one force would join the other force, at just the right time, and voila!, the Nephites would finally be defeated and the Amlicites would get their king.  This is why, oh coincidence of all coincidences!, there just happened to be an army of the Lamanites armed and ready to invade when the Amlicites made their move:

And it came to pass that on the morrow they returned into the camp of the Nephites in great haste, being greatly astonished, and struck with much fear, saying:

Behold, we followed the camp of the Amlicites, and to our great astonishment, in the land of Minon, above the land of Zarahemla, in the course of the land of Nephi, we saw a numerous host of the Lamanites; and behold, the Amlicites have joined them; and they are upon our brethren in that land; and they are fleeing before them with their flocks, and their wives, and their children, towards our city; and except we make haste they obtain possession of our city, and our fathers, and our wives, and our children be slain.  (Alma 2:23-25)

This was no coincidence.  This was the secret plan of Nehor and Amlici and the other dissenters who had crossed the border from the Lamanite lands into the Nephite lands.  The meeting of Lamanites and Amlicites was a scheduled meeting.  Everything was going more or less according to plan.  If it weren’t for that pesky strength of the Lord miracle that the Lord kept bestowing upon the Nephites, they would have succeeded.

In conclusion

There need not be any anachronism if Skousen is correct about Amlicite and Amalekite being one and the same word.  Hopefully this will silence all those who constantly look for any dang thing to show that the Book of Mormon is wrong; at the very least, on this one point.  But I ain’t gonna hold my breath on that.

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We are all the Rich Young Ruler


I wanted to express my heart as it pertains to something I’ve heard from LDS leaders previously — specifically because I heard it just heard it again from a member of the quorum of the 70 during this most recent General Conference.

It concerns a false interpretation of the story given in Matthew 19:

and behold
one came and said unto Jesus

good master
what good thing shall I do
that I may have eternal life?

and Jesus said unto him

why do you call me “good“?
there is none good
but one
and that is god
but
if you want to experience eternal life
then you must keep the commandments

he said unto him

which ones?

Jesus said

do not take life
do not cheat on your spouse
do not steal
do not speak falsely
honor your parents
love your neighbor as though they were yourself

the young man said

all these things have I done since my youth
what else am I lacking?

Jesus said

if you want to be perfect
go and sell all that you have
and give to the poor
then you will have treasure in heaven instead
and then come and follow me

but he went away sorrowful after hearing that
because he had amassed great wealth

This is a scripture with an obvious interpretation:  namely that if we want to follow Christ, we must first sell all of our material possessions and follow after Jesus.  And because of that, it’s something that has always been interpreted by modern men to have “some other” application that “doesn’t apply” to us today [just so we can get away from addressing what it really means for us as a society today].

Most recently, I heard Larry Lawrence [of the Quorum of the Seventy] teach false doctrine to the saints of Christ as it relates to this topic.  He said:

Let’s consider the New Testament account of the rich young ruler. He was a righteous young man who was already keeping the Ten Commandments, but he wanted to become better. His goal was eternal life.

When he met the Savior, he asked, “What lack I yet?

Jesus answered immediately, giving counsel that was intended specifically for the rich young man.  Jesus said unto him, “If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and … come and follow me.”

What Lack I Yet?

Note the part I bolded from Elder Lawrence’s talk he gave to latter-day saints.  The human inclination is to read this story and ass-u-me that the counsel that Jesus gave applies only to that man in question.  The proper position that a man of God would take is to let that scripture prick conscience of the people and convict us of sin, insofar as we withhold our surplus from the needy, impoverished, and destitute.

I want to state, unequivocally, by the power of the Holy Spirit which is in me — that the counsel of Jesus given to the rich, young man in Matthew 19 was not “intended specifically for the rich young man” — this is false doctrine, and what Jesus said is true for all people who want to truly follow Him.

It is true for each-and-every one of us — that if we want to experience eternal life, then we must cease to covet the abundance we have and be free-and-willing to share all that we have with the needy, impoverished, and destitute.  And, if we are not willing, then we will find ourselves with the rest of the “rich men” — in hell lifting up our eyes, being in torment.

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Happy 8th Birthday, LDS Anarchy Blog! – Significant Posts Edition


The LDS Anarchy blog has been around since October 7th, 2007.  Today marks its eighth birthday.  As my own eighth birthday was my all-time favorite birthday, and as that year in which I was 8 years old—between my 8th and 9th birthdays, i.e., my ninth year—turned out to be my all-time favorite year, the number 8 also turned out to be my favorite number growing up, as can be expected, (but I no longer have a favorite number.)  So, I thought that the blog required a post to celebrate its eighth birthday.

Here then is a list of eight (really, nine) posts of mine, one from each of the eight years of this blog’s existence (plus one more), that were especially significant or impactful to me, or that I think might end up being impactful to others or to society as a whole.  Feel free to type out your own list of 8 (or 9) impactful LDS Anarchy posts in the comments below.  (My list will undoubtedly not be the same as yours.)

 

 2007

Joseph Smith’s Daguerreotype – An Appeal for Help

I have a sneaky suspicion that we have not heard the last from this curious daguerreotype, and that it may end up having more than a cursory impact on the world.  But if not, it surely had impact on me and I am glad that I spotted it.

 

2008

Introducing a new bartering currency—the first coin: 1/2 Troy oz pure silver .999 fine

This manifested currency will not have a cursory impact, but will have a huge impact on the entire world.  There is a whole lot more than meets the eye to this thing, and I got the latest scoop, but I ain’t telling.  (Sometimes it is best to leave things as a surprise.)   So, I gotta mark this one as going to be very significant and impactful.

 

2009

The Split-Brain Model of the Gospel

If people knew the ultra-adverse circumstances under which this post was written, they would be flabbergasted.  Every time I think back to those days, when I was composing it, I myself am dumbfounded.  I don’t know if it will affect anyone else, but for me, it brought a whole lot of things into view that previously I had not seen.

 

2010

An alternate view of the keys

Again, I don’t know if this post is significant to others, but to me the prophecies and teachings in it helped clear up a lot of prior confusion.

 

2011

“…and the labor which they had to perform was to look…”

There were other significant posts during this year, such as Lehi’s Trek to China and North America and How to receive what you ask for, but, although the above was tiny compared to these other two, it packed a wallop as far as potential impact on society as a whole, for all must learn to perform this labor, and it has had a huge effect on me.

 

2012

The Strength of the Lord

This year was not one of many posts, (for me, at least), and so there isn’t much to choose from, nor are they of the highest quality or of ground-breaking topics, but regardless, this particular post, or the information in it, will have a huge impact on society because it reveals that the strength of the Lord was a supernatural miracle.  This is extremely important to understand, because this miracle is coming back, to be first demonstrated by the Josephite, who will be taken out of his weakness and made (miraculously) strong.

 

2013

The faith of God, part fourteen: God is a miracle worker, not a scientist

This one is significant because it corrects a major error had among latter-day saints.  I’m not sure what kind of impact it will have, but it had a major effect on me, for it fully lays out one of the reasons why we can put all our trust in God, without any hesitation, whatsoever.

 

2014

Book of Mormon surnames: the meaning of the -ites and “people of”

The post (and its correction in the follow-up comments) is significant because it gives the future name of the Josephite: Joseph-Nephi-Lehi.  The Josephite and his ministry will have such a gigantic impact in our day, that being able to correctly identify him is vitally important.  I have written several posts about this guy, detailing what he will be doing, what instruments he will be using, what his name will be, his age, his stature, and so forth, as I have been given understanding about him, because his significance cannot be stressed enough.  Although I have told my sons much more about him than I have released on this blog, that does not downplay what is written in these various posts about him.  To me this stuff strikes me as of paramount importance.

 

2015

They did it for prosperity, dominion, discovery, diversity, defense and memorial

Arguably, this was a toss-up between the above post and The New Articles of Confederation (NAC).  Which will have greater impact on society?  On the surface, it would appear to be the NAC, based upon what I wrote in the 13-article essays on it, but the NAC, as great an effect it will have on this nation, and also on the world, will pale in comparison to that which the prosperity miracle and anti-prosperity miracle will have on world society.  The NAC can be thought of as a set-up for the re-introduction of the prosperity and anti-prosperity miracles.  When these miracles are unleashed upon society (through the faith of the Josephite), conditions will so vastly alter as to make the NAC’s rather large alteration of conditions of almost no consequence.  This post, then, is significant and impactful because it teaches us that these specific things are coming back with a vengeance.

The LDS Anarchy blog serves as a repository for my thoughts.  (It has never been an attempt at mere popularity.)  And there are a whole lot more thoughts in my head that I have yet to put down on paper or type into a computer, let alone publicly release on this blog.  Some of these things must and will stay in my head, some of them I have and will continue to release privately, to my sons or others in real life, while other thoughts, if they strike me as important that the public know, will continue to be released on this blog.  I fully expect, therefore, that the LDS Anarchy blog will continue unabated for the present time.  I certainly felt inspired to start this blog and I have received no inspiration saying to shut it down.  In fact, the only indication that I have received is that this blog will yet be of even greater usefulness in the future, that there is some strange purpose to it that pertains to the future, and that what lies in the future, concerning this blog, may yet outshine what has come before.  Who knows what interesting information and new concepts are yet to come out of it?  The last eight years have certainly produced some novel ideas here, found absolutely nowhere else.  If the past can tell us of the future, then I think it is a safe bet that it hasn’t filled up its cup of curiosities, just yet.  So, Happy Birthday, LDS Anarchy!  May this next year be your absolute best, and our all-time favorite!

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